How to Reconstruct Publishing:

Competing Visions, Channels and Audiences.

Publishers' Forum

27 - 28 April 2015 in Berlin

Editorial

11. September 2014 by Stefan Kaufer | Comments Off

How to Reconstruct Publishing / Das Verlagsgeschäft neu ausrichten

Competing Visions, Channels and Audiences
With the transformation of the publishing industry in full swing, the goal of the 2015 edition of the Publishers’ Forum Berlin will be to identify exemplary perspectives and topics, where the strategic visions meet with the practical challenges and opportunities. [Read more ...]

Konkurrierende Visionen, Kanäle und Zielgruppen
Der Umbau des Verlagsgeschäfts ist auf dem Weg. Beim Publishers‘ Forum 2015 werden dazu exemplarische Themen und Gestaltungen zur Diskussion gestellt, in denen sich die strategischen Ausblicke mit den Herausforderungen und Innovationschancen der Alltagspraxis treffen. [Mehr lesen ...]

Blog

6. May 2014 by Simon Arnold | Comments Off

An Architecture of Collaboration

Under the title “An Architecture of Collaboration”, Brian O’Leary opened by dealing with two flawed assumptions underlying thinking around media – the “stable media industry” and the idea of a “limited (reading) pie”.

Belief in a “limited (reading) pie” puts publishers on the defensive and leads to talk about “losing share” to new media.

The market for reading may be actually expanding in the current environment, but the expansion is taking place largely outside the traditional supply chains.

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6. May 2014 by Simon Arnold | Comments Off

The latest developments in educational publishing and personalized learning

The begin this collaborative presentation, Fionnuala Duggan outlined the fundamental factors of the transition to digital for educational publishers.

Education is undergoing a different transition to digital as other branches of the media industry. People don’t consume educational material in the same way as music or consumer e-books.

Learning platforms will bring some combination of: assessments, analytics, adaptive, personalized, social, “anytime anywhere”, remote access, scalability.

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6. May 2014 by Simon Arnold | Comments Off

Reinvention, Revolution and Revitalization: Real Life Tales from Publishing’s Front Lines

Matt Turner, CTO for Media and Publishing at MarkLogic, outlined their vision of flexible, adaptive, data-aware information delivery platforms backed by a new generation of databases chosen to select the type of information being stored and equipped with semantic search capabilities.

In his opinion, this is not a change from analog to digital but from publisher to information publisher. And information publishers need to build information delivery platforms which allow for one-to-one customization. The motto that goes into being an information provider: We sell queries.

 

6. May 2014 by Stefan Kaufer | Comments Off

Standing ovation for Helmut von Berg at end of Forum

imagehttps://twitter.com/porter_anderson/status/463703712272510976

 

6. May 2014 by Simon Arnold | Comments Off

State of Publishing 2020

From left to right: Francis Bennett, Yale University Press, UK | Dr. Sven Fund, de Gruyter, GER | Nigel Newton, Bloomsbury Publishing, UK | David Worlock, Outsell, UK.

From left to right: Francis Bennett, Yale University Press, UK | Dr. Sven Fund, de Gruyter, GER | Nigel Newton, Bloomsbury Publishing, UK | David Worlock, Outsell, UK.

The second day of the Publishers’ Forum 2014 opened with a panel discussion among three “conservative men with revolution in their hearts”: Nigel Newton, Bloomsbury Publishing plc; Francis Bennett, Yale University Press; Dr. Sven Fund, de Gruyter.

Newton started by advising publishers to do three things with a view to 2020: get good at dealing with customers, be prepared for the English language to spread even further – i.e. cease selling translation rights for English and use an existing English publisher as distribution partner – and view the internet as an opportunity for direct contact with readers in order to sell books direct to them instead of through online or mail order wholesalers. Speaking to his primary concerns, he mentioned the area of pricing in face of competition from internet wholesalers and his fear that, during their commute, ”…too many male readers will stare moronically at a … TV series.”

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6. May 2014 by Simon Arnold | Comments Off

Bridging the Gap: What if you can’t make what the consumer actually wants?

Brian o'Leary (left) pictured with Baldur Bjarnason.

Brian o’Leary (left) pictured with Baldur Bjarnason.

Baldur Bjarnason, Unbound, established three key premises at the beginning of his presentation: firstly, the core function of a publisher is to help people help themselves; secondly, there are two types of consumer – those who love the product (form) for itself, and those who use it because it is the best solution to their problem; and finally, e-books are not a digital thing, they are a print thing which is distributed digitally.

The industry can choose between two paths: maintaining the status quo, continue to produce books for people who love books; or go all in on digital with the associated transformation and difficulties with formats and technologies. It’s impossible to take both paths, because you’ll have to face all the challenges of the new with the burden of existing costs.

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6. May 2014 by Simon Arnold | Comments Off

What Self Publishing Teaches Publishers

From left to right: Porter Anderson, Ed Nawotka and Hugh Howey.

From left to right: Porter Anderson, Ed Nawotka and Hugh Howey.

This panel kicked-off with some figures on the phenomenal importance of self-publishing in the American market: self-publishers registered 390,000 ISBNs last year vs. the 300,000 registered by traditional publishers. The represents 14% growth in the number of self-published titles over last year and more than 400% over the last 5 years.

The discussion revolved around the following four points:

1. A focus on the reader rather than on the retail chain.

Quite a number of traditional authors see their primary relationship as being with their publisher, but self-publishers are fanatical about their fans. What publishers can do is provide more assistance to their authors to engage with their readers. But, there needs to be clarity of expectations with regard to marketing: publishers shouldn’t promise too much, and authors have to expect to be involved to a greater degree, especially in the building of communities around their works – the key is collaboration.

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6. May 2014 by Steinfeld, Petra | Comments Off

Häuserkampf Teil 2

Prognose E-Books: Die Auslieferungsdienstleister wagten eine Prognose über E-Book-Anteile in 2016/18:
HGV, Ludger Wicher: 25% aber abhängig von technischen Innovationen.
KNO-VA, Thomas Raff: Haptische Produkte sind eindeutig schrumpfend, keine Prognose.
VVA, Stephan Schierke: Physische Produkte schrumpfen in Stückzahl 2% pro Jahr, E-Produkte 25%. RML wagt ebenfalls keine Prognose.
Petra Steinfeld, Klopotek

6. May 2014 by Steinfeld, Petra | Comments Off

Aufruf zum Häuserkampf

Aufruf der Auslieferungsdienstleister zum “Häuserkampf”: Im Rahmen der deutschen Executive Lounge riefen alle vier anwesenden Auslieferungen zum “Häuserkampf” auf, um den Handel zu bewegen, seine POS-Zahlen zur Steuerung der Logistik zu übermitteln.
Damit gewinnen Verlage und Dienstleister und Handel, denn Remissionen würden vermieden und der Abverkauf kann beobachtet oder forciert werden. RML ist vom Anspruch defensiver und maßt sich nicht an, Nachproduktionen als Dienstleister zu steuern. Bei Online-Verkäufen ist – wenn auch nur beim remote digital warehouse – der Abverkauf leicht zu ermitteln. Mit dem kommenden Remissionsrecht ab Juni 14 wird für die Dienstleister eine weitere Hürde aufgebaut. Teil 2 folgt

6. May 2014 by Simon Arnold | Comments Off

Latest News from EDitEUR

“All metadata is about identity,” and all publishers know how important it is - both for the maintenance of their data internally and for its presentation to external parties or on e-commerce sites – to have correct identifiers and metadata.

Identifiers should ideally be persistent and meaningless. This is currently a problem with ISBN. The information encoded in the ISBN often doesn’t tell us what we think it does. The next regular review process has begun and is expected to take two to three years. The good news for publishers is that no radical changes are expected.

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